Monthly Archives: October 2012

Skeleton’s DNA matches missing worker, Supat to face murder rap


Thailand
Phetchaburi provincial court has approved an arrest warrant for former Police General Hospital doctor Pol Col Supat Laohawattana, who is suspected of multiple murders.

DNA evidence continues to crack cases


Florida
TAMPA On Oct. 18, a 70-year-old woman was raped inside a Sulphur Springs church. Five days later, Tampa police arrested 26-year-old Demetreius Martees Morris and charged him with sexual battery.
The capture of Morris came thanks to DNA that linked him to the crime. The arrest is the latest example of how the marriage of medical technology and database management is giving law enforcement tools they could only dream of even a few years ago.

Social Media, Newly Discovered DNA Breathes New Life Info 32-Year-Old Cold Case

COLUMBUS, Ohio – A sister is searching for answers after her brother went missing when she was 9 years old – 32 years ago.

State police picks Morpho’s biometric ID system

Morpho, a security division of Safran S.A., said today the Massachusetts State Police has selected its U.S. subsidiary, MorphoTrak, to provide MorphoBIS, its next-generation biometric identification system, for the Commonwealth’s new statewide system.

DNA Testing ‘On Edge Of Breakthrough’

The latest breakthrough being pursued in DNA testing would vastly decrease the time it takes to produce results. The Rapid DNA project seeks to create an automated, self-contained system that produces a forensic profile compatible with standard databases from a sample in less than 90 minutes, compared to the current typical turnaround time of 30 to 90 days.

Expanded DNA collection draws fire


Wisconsin
State’s plan to take samples during arrests seen as intrusion on rights of accused

What Happens After Jurors Get It Wrong?

About 300 people have been wrongfully convicted and exonerated in the U.S. thanks to DNA evidence. But overlooked in those stories are the accounts of jurors who unwittingly played a role in the injustice.

Construction Begins On New County Police Crime Lab

ST. LOUIS COUNTY (KMOX) – Today, St. Louis County Police will start construction on a $9.2 million crime lab.

Bill to create bank for DNA profiling of accused coming


India
A Bill to create a DNA data centre to profile people accused of serious crimes and unknown deceased is in the works. The proposal was originally mooted in 2007 but was dropped to factor in ethical, moral and legal issues on the sensitive matter.

Prosecutors Say There Is DNA Evidence Linking Suspect to Jessica Ridgeway’s Murder

Prosecutors in court said they have a confession and DNA tying a 17-year-old college student to the kidnapping and murder of Jessica Ridgeway after sources tell ABC News that human remains were found at his home in Westminster, Colo.

Crime lab says Seamons’ DNA claim ‘doesn’t make sense’

OGDEN — The head of the Utah State Crime Lab says it would be almost impossible for a father’s DNA to be confused with that of his son.

NM AG’s office creates new ‘exoneration unit’


SANTA FE, N.M. (AP) — The New Mexico’s Attorney General’s office has created a new unit aimed at addressing challenges to homicide and sexual assault convictions.

The next generation of biometrics – from rapid DNA analysis to social networking – revealed at Biometrics 2012

At Biometrics 2012 [Westminster, London, 29-31 October 2012], more than 50 top international speakers will convene to reveal how biometric technology such as fingerprint, facial and iris recognition, and the latest technologies such as DNA and odour, is being used to identify individuals.

Using science to uncover a crime


australia
Television show CSI: Crime Scene Investigation has given the career of forensic scientist the sort of attention it might not otherwise have had.
In Sydney, much of the forensic work for NSW Police is done in a lab in Lidcombe, where Todd McBriar leads a team of 22 analysts dealing with up to 300 cases a month.

DNA tests fail to solve historical riddle


Switzerland
The identity of a body exhumed in Chur cathedral and thought to be that of the 17th century freedom fighter Jürg Jenatsch remains unresolved, despite the efforts of an international team of scientists using DNA analysis.